Tuesday, January 20, 2015

8th Grade: Native American Assimilation

Using your notes from the presentation, the film clips, and the map and article in your packet, describe the challenges faced by our nation's Native Americans in the late 1800's-early 1900's.  (Post as ANONYMOUS, using first name, last initial and class period only.)


9 comments:

  1. Back then, there were a lot of challenges that the native american's faced. Such as, The Dawes Act. The Dawes Act was when they took Indian children and sent them to special schools. It was almost like kidnapping them. Another challenge was during the Dawes Act, Indians lost 93 million acres of land. Back then was a tough time for Indians.
    Noelle G Period 1/2A

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  2. The Native Americans faced many challenges in the late 1880's and early 1900's. One of these challenges was the poverty that nearly all of these people faced. Reservations were poor, and when the Native Americans who lived in reservations did leave with the relocation program, they faced more poverty in the cities. Another challenge was prejudice. People were biased against the Native Americans; they were not like the "perfect" American of the time, so people tried to change them. Children were sent to schools with the aim to make them white: one school's motto was to "make apples: red on the outside, white on the inside". They faced prejudice in the government as well: everyone was trying to take their land and change them into white people.

    Caitlin G
    1/2 A

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  3. The United State's Native Americans face many challenges in the late 1800's to early 1900's. The Dawes act was put in place, and children were taken from their Indian homes and brought to schools were they assimilated to the White culture. There were also many schemes that took place to steal Indian land. For instance, the white man forced Indians to change there culture and live like the white man, where every man owned his own portion of land. This resulted in stolen Indian land. Americans also were attempting to give Indians lots of land that was already theirs. This sometimes succeeded and resulted in more stolen Indian land. Signs were often put up in white cities advertising an "Indian land surplus". This caused a rush to the West where people decided to steal their land.

    Sharon S.
    1/2 A

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  4. Indians faced many challenges. The childern were taken from their homes and sent to schools to become more "white". This was the result of "the Dawes act". The plan was to turn the childern into Americans, to remove the culture from them, and dress them as Americans. The childern faced many challenges, some schools were very far away from home. This meant many parents could not visit their kids. The schools also had very poor conditions, causing illness and death. Along with the these challenges came many more, the tribes faced Poverty and discrimination and many challeges.

    Alex Wallace Period 1/2 A

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  5. In the late 1800's and early 1900's, Native Americans were treated horribly. The Dawes Assimilate Act required the government to take the children of the Native Americans and make them white. They would put the children in schools, like Carlisle School in PA, and cut their hair, dress them differently and teach them to be the "perfect white child". The General Allotment Act gave the Indians permission to use their own land. The Relocation Program was in the 1950's and told the Indians to move to the bigger cities. The government promised them jobs and to show them how to do their jobs. That was not fulfilled. The once huge reservations are now small pieces of land.
    Paige S. p.1/2A

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  6. The Nation's Native Americans had a lot of trouble from the late 1800's to the 1900's. They were treated horribly in an effort to make them "civilized". Their children were sent to schools to make them like the whites, while the tribes were kicked off their lands. Many tried to fit into society but they were still outcasts, and treated like it. Though tried to be the perfect white citizens they were still treated awfully and discriminated. So they were kicked off their land, their children were forced into awful schools, and they were cast aside. It was a horrible time to be Native American.

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  7. The natives of this nation had many struggles. They lived on the land that nobody wanted, and were always moving to smaller pieces of land. They were always giving their belongings to the government, and most had nothing left, including their dignity. Their children were taken away from them and sent to boarding schools, where they were forced to cut their hair, and take a "white name". They learned their culture was wrong, and that they were sinners for believing in it. When they finally came home, they were made fun of, and couldn't fit in.
    -Liam O'Brien P. 1/2 B

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  8. The Native American’s in our nation faced many hardships. American was trying to assimilate the Native Americans. They were trying to assimilate the Natives because Americans believed that the Native ways were wrong, and that their own ways were the proper way to live. To inforce the American ways on the Natives the Dawes Act was put into place. The Dawes Act speedup assimilation by ridding the land of reserves and allotting land to individual indians. The indians did not want to move, so they resisted. The Dawes Act was not the only challenge that Natives faced; they also had to face the challenge of the Americans trying to change their culture. At a young age indians would be taken away from the reserves they lived on and their family, and would be shipped off to American boarding schools. They did not go willingly. The Natives went to these boarding schools to be stripped of their beliefs. Then when they returned many years they would not fit in on the reserve because the were raised as an American.
    Casey B 1-2 B

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